Mitral Valve Prolapse: Get The Facts Before Treating – It Could Be Dysautonomia

November 1, 2017

Heart Disease Article

Comments Off on Mitral Valve Prolapse: Get The Facts Before Treating – It Could Be Dysautonomia


Many people are diagnosed each year with mitral valve prolapse, which indicates that one or both of the mitral valves aren’t opening and shutting correctly as blood is pumped from the top part of the heart to the bottom part where it then goes out to the rest of the body. This diagnosis infers that the valve is prolapsed due to a structural problem with the valve itself, requiring surgical correction or replacement to correct the problem.

People usually go to the doctor with symptoms like lightheadedness or fainting (syncope), racing heart when standing (tachycardia), gastrointestinal issues, general fatigue, low blood pressure, numbness, brain fog, etc., and when tests indicate that blood flow through the heart isn’t right, or it looks like the valves aren’t opening and shutting right, then the diagnosis is often mitral valve prolapse. Then for some reason, this diagnosis infers that there is something structurally wrong with the valve. What’s important to keep in mind about this diagnosis is that the dysfunction of the valve may not be a structural defect that requires surgery–it may actually be a dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system or dysautonomia that is actually behind the valve not operating properly.

As you might guess, mitral valve prolapse often has symptoms similar to dysautonomia symptoms. And when they can’t put their finger on exactly what is causing the valve dysfunction or the group of symptoms, they call it MVP syndrome–which is actually dysautonomia when you get down to the details. Fortunately, many forms of dysautonomia can be treated and effectively with a variety of natural treatment options including nutritional supplementation, exercise, maintaining proper water and electrolyte balance, and other things that don’t require surgery.

Granted, in some cases there is a structural defect or problem with the valve that does require surgery to correct. But if there’s any doubt at all about that, it can be more than worth your while to seek the opinion of an autonomic disorder specialist or dysautonomia doctor and at least let them run a few tests, and certainly before undergoing surgery. And the best places to do that is to Google something like dysautonomia doctor or dysautonomia treatment center. Even if there isn’t one locally where you are, it can be worth it to travel to a top-rated clinic and get some definitive answers before you start other treatment protocols. It is far better to be as clear as possible about what is going on and then begin treatment than to start treatments when you’re not sure.